General Overview

About the TASA/TASB Exhibit of School Architecture

The TASA/TASB Exhibit of School Architecture showcases new and renovated Texas schools and celebrates excellence in planning and design of the learning environment. With an emphasis on learning, community context, aspects of enhance value, and designs that support learners, the exhibit becomes a digital resource for all engaged in creating optimized student learning.

History

TASA/TASB began hosting the Exhibit of School Architecture in 1987. In 1991, the competition’s award became known as “The Caudill,” after Texas architect William Wayne Caudill (1914–1983).

In 1941, William Caudill, a young architect on the faculty of Texas A&M wrote a book about school design called Space for Teaching. Although he had not designed a school himself at the time, his progressive concepts explained in that early book were so dynamic that they continue to influence school design more than 50 years later. In 1985, Caudill became the first and only Texas architect to receive the American Institute of Architects’ highest individual honor, the Gold Medal, in recognition of his influence as an architect, educator, and author. Under Caudill’s visionary leadership, the achievements of the company he founded—Caudill, Rowlett, and Scott—can be seen in the education facilities of some 26 states and eight countries.

Stars of Distinction

Projects can be awarded Stars of Distinction as recognition in one or more Areas of Distinction. Projects may be submitted in as many Areas of Distinction as the Architect deems appropriate.

Caudill Class

The Caudill Class is a design standard presented to districts and architects selected from the field of projects that have received at least four stars from the six Areas of Distinction. Caudill Class recognition is not limited in number but is awarded to any entry that, in the opinion of the Caudill Jury, is worthy of this special recognition.

More information

Questions? E-mail arivas@tasanet.org or call 512.852.2121.