Sustainability

Sustainable design strives to minimize the building impact on the environment, enhance student wellbeing and connect learners with the natural environment. Describe the projects sustainable attributes and how those have been articulated into learning opportunities for students.

Austin Community College—San Gabriel Campus

Austin Community College—San Gabriel Campus

The College has a history of starting new campuses in unique places. Its first campus, opened in 1973, was made from an abandoned all-black high school. The latest campus before this one was created in an empty shopping mall. This campus, on former ranch land at a new light rail stop, will begin a new community that includes, not only a college campus, but also a High School, a YMCA, a Civic Center, a Civic Plaza, and direct connections to surrounding planned

Comal ISD—Pieper Ranch Middle School

Comal ISD—Pieper Ranch Middle School

As one of the fastest-growing districts in the nation, this community is experiencing the challenges of transitioning from rural to suburban. With this in mind, the district needed a middle school that would be flexible in use and purpose. The open and collaborative result can evolve with the changing needs of instruction and increasing student enrollment. A 70-foot change in grade led to a terraced, circular layout around a busy, activity-filled courtyard that serves as a town square.

Coppell ISD—Coppell Middle School West

Coppell ISD—Coppell Middle School West

In a growing district with needed relief at their single high school, this new 204,000-square-foot middle school allowed an existing middle school space to become the district’s ninth-grade center. A key factor of the relocation was maintaining the original campus’ identity beyond the name and mascot. Updates to the facility supported the district’s adopted method of learning through the “house” concept. Technology, collaboration, and learner-focused design were key design decisions.

Dallas ISD—Solar Preparatory School for Girls at James B. Bonham

Dallas ISD—Solar Preparatory School for Girls at James B. Bonham

  • 2 story Addition/Renovation to existing 1923 structure with connecting atrium
  • All-girls STEAM Academy features exploratory academic spaces, learning stairs for informal/group education & transparent spaces with sliding glass doors for learning on display
  • PBL/Maker spaces, Robotics, Science & Art, open into communal areas
  • Outdoor areas offer out-of-the-box education
  • Project includes a tornado shelter incorporated into the design of the cafetorium, with overhead rolling doors
DeSoto ISD—Katherine Johnson Technology Magnet Academy

DeSoto ISD—Katherine Johnson Technology Magnet Academy

Due to the appeal of alternative educational options and a prolonged lack of growth in District class sizes, a set of project goals were established to focus on enhancing enrollment and driving daily attendance. From those goals, an elementary school program was established that would offer its students access to technology-based educational opportunities and expose them to science, tech, engineering, math, and outdoor learning, proactively setting them up for success in fast-growing industries.

Manor ISD—Lagos Elementary School

This school is designed to support the District’s project-based learning & sustainability objectives. This Net Zero Energy design goal incorporates sustainable features. Learning Neighborhoods are organized by grade & supported by breakout spaces. Transparency in spaces creates a “Learning on Display” environment that allows supervision between traditional & flexible learning. The core of the building is the cafeteria, gym & library that can be used for community functions outside school hours.

Round Rock ISD—Nature to Neighborhood Studio

Round Rock ISD—Nature to Neighborhood Studio

With financial and inspirational support to create “Destination Schools” within the district, leaders at one elementary school with a unique location and story chose to become the school for enrichment and the environment. Perched on a bluff overlooking a 30,000-acre national wildlife refuge, campus leadership began developing environments that support their vision. Here students interact with nature on a daily basis with surprising and positive outcomes.